A Call To Action To Aid Sierra Leone Ebola Victims

The distribution of food and supplies by Rev. Kargbo to victims of the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.

The distribution of food and supplies by Rev. Kargbo to victims of the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone.

The Transformational Education Network (TEN3) is asking for you to partner with us in a call to action to help the people of Sierra Leone who have been devastated by the outbreak of the Ebola virus.

We in TEN3 are supporting Global Partners, the missions arm of The Wesleyan Church, to fund a multi-pronged project to provide aid and assistance to children, parents and families in a Sierra Leone community whose lives have been ravaged by Ebola.

The threat of the Ebola is still haunting Sierra Leone, where transmission remains widespread with 74 new cases in the past week, according to the World Health Organization. The continued Ebola outbreak is most intense in the capital of Freetown, with 45 reported cases in the week ending Feb. 15.

Since the Ebola outbreak last year, the WHO has tracked 23,253 cases in nine countries, with 9,380 confirmed fatalities. The worst-hit have been Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in west Africa. Sierra Leone has had 11,103 cases of Ebola — the most of any country — resulting in 3,408 deaths.

The name of the Global Partners project is the “Waterloo/Banga Farm Area Ebola Epidemic.” This project will improve sanitation and psycho-social services in quarantined homes in the Waterloo/Banga Farm area and its immediate environs.

This will be accomplished in a number of ways. For starters, 20 volunteer counselors will be trained to provide psycho-social counseling care to 2,600 beneficiaries in quarantined homes and holding centers. Another 10 volunteers will be trained as health educators to provide environmental health protection messages to 2,000 Ebola beneficiaries.

A third aspect will be training 20 volunteer pastors to visit, console and offer prayers and messages of hope to victims. The project will also provide supplies of used clothing and shoes, rubber buckets, soap, toothpaste and toothbrushes, Dettol — a hygiene product — and other disinfectants for homes.

The last piece of the project will be to provide toys for children and radio sets and batteries for the homes. An untold number of children have been orphaned by the plague of Ebola.

We have been monitoring the situation in Sierra Leone closely through the heroic service of Rev. Samuel Kargbo. Last summer, we were working with Rev. Kargbo to launch a Christ-centered Computer Training Outreach school in Freetown, Sierra Leone. But the Ebola virus outbreak derailed those plans amidst a devastating outbreak of the disease that at one point was requiring 15 funerals a day in Rev. Kargbo’s community.

Rev. Kargbo and his wife, Mary, have been faithfully and compassionately tending to the orphans, widows and other victims of their neighborhood. We are thankful to the Lord for keeping them free of the disease as they tend to the myriad needs of the people of their community.

Rev. Kargbo providing food for victims of  Ebola in Sierra Leone.

Rev. Kargbo providing food for victims of Ebola in Sierra Leone.

Now is the opportunity for you to come alongside them. The budget for this project is a mere $15,137 in U.S. dollars. Will you help?

Donations to the project can be made in the following manner:

–Checks made out to Global Partners; write WM06-1489 on the memo line and send to: Global Partners, PO Box 50434, Indianapolis IN 46250-0434;

–Online: You can go to http://www.globalpartnersonline.org/partner/give/projects and in the first dropdown menu, select Sierra Leone, then click GO. Scroll down until you see the Waterloo/Banga Farm Area Ebola Epidemic project and click “Give Now.”

We ask that you continue to pray for containment of the virus and to strengthen the people of Sierra Leone, including Rev. Samuel Kargbo and his family. Thank you and God bless you.

Distribution of supplies by Rev. Kargbo to Ebola victims.

Distribution of supplies by Rev. Kargbo to Ebola victims.

`To Reach Out In Diverse Ways’

Kwangs Dauda (right) speaks with Intensive Christian Training School founder Eric Black.

Kwangs Dauda (right) speaks with Intensive Christian Training School founder Eric Black.

Kwangs Dauda seems to have an easy peace about him. Young and strong with a military background, Dauda is 25 years old and a self-described changed man. After attending Intensive Christian Training School in Biliri, Nigeria, Dauda said he learned a lot.

“I learned how to live in peace with the community and how to love more and how to be humble,” he said with a smile in the school’s courtyard. He also learned how to tell somebody about Christ, he said. Evangelization is something he enjoys the most now.

In particular, Dauda enjoyed the Transformational Education Network (TEN3) program at the school. The Intensive Christian Training School was founded and operated by missionary Eric Black. The school trains students in using computers and in addition to Windows, teaches the Linux operating system and the open source platform Ubuntu.

Dauda said he would love for all of his friends and all the youth around to have the same experience. He would love to have more support, primarily technical support and materials for the program, Dauda said.

“It will go a long ways to help the Tangali people and the Christians in the community to reach out in diverse ways,” Dauda said. “When you learn how to use the computer you can preach through the computer, you can enlighten someone with the computer and get them to know Christ.”

For more information on the school and to see an interview with Dauda, go here: https://vimeo.com/114681648

–By Matt Sabo, TEN3 Communications Manager

On The Outside Looking In

Boys at an African school.

The two little boys were outside the classroom peering in. Surely intrigued by the white guys in the classroom, the boys were trying to get a look at what was going on. To me, though, the photo is symbolic of the things we’re trying to accomplish in the Transformational Education Network.

The photo is dark, the boys essentially silhouettes. You can’t see their eyes, or even get a glimpse of the expressions on their faces. The details in the classroom are featureless and you can’t see any students.

Here’s another photo of that classroom.

Kubacha classroom

What a difference some illumination makes, eh? Our work in Nigeria and elsewhere in Africa and the Caribbean brings the light of the gospel to dark places. In Nigeria, in particular, where we are working the darkness of Islam pervades the country. I met many dedicated, faithful Christians intent on sharing the love and hope of Jesus and we pray for these people fervently.

In addition to teaching a world view centered on Jesus Christ, we are equipping students with computer knowledge. This knowledge is a means to not only obtain employment skills for jobs, but also to use that technological ability to further the gospel message. These young students pictured here in the Nigerian city of Kubacha, we pray, as they advance in school will someday become the students in post-secondary classrooms receiving the Christ-centered knowledge from our Transformational Education Network curriculum.

I was blown away when I visited this class of 44 young students at Christian school operated by the Evangelical Church Winning All denomination. The kids were unfailingly polite, knowledgeable, inquisitive and eager. There’s a tremendous amount of potential for the kingdom among these students and our prayer in TEN3 is that we will be able to be a part of equipping them for further Kingdom work personally and corporately.

If you’d like to see some videos of the work we are doing around the world, go here: https://vimeo.com/home/myvideos

For more on TEN3, visit our website at http://www.ten3.org.

God bless you.

–Matt Sabo, TEN3 Communications Manager